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Origin of Street Names  
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Last modified 12/09/11

SOURCE: Glens Falls Post-Star, daily feature ca. 1937

ORIGIN OF STREET NAMES IN GLENS FALLS
Finding aid - Click first letter of street name:  A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z  

ACKLEY STREET

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Ackley Street was named about 42 or 43 years ago after Thomas Ackley, who, at that time, owned the house at 13 Grove Ave., that faces  the north end of the street.
ARLINGTON STREET

This street is one of a development including Franklin, Boylston, Beacon, Tremont and Woodward Streets, which were opened about twenty years ago by the Montrose Real Estate Corp. of Boston, Mass. These streets were named for streets in Boston.

ASHLEY PLACE This street, which was opened about ten years ago, was named for the late Eugene L. Ashley.  Mr. Ashley formerly owned a mile tract of land in that vicinity, and when the section was developed recently it was decided to name a street in his honor.
BALDWIN AVENUE

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This street was named for the late Philander Baldwin, who came here from Chestertown, purchased a tract of land and laid out the street. Mr. Baldwin's home stood on the corner of Bay Street and Baldwin Ave.
BASIN STREET This street was so named because it ran down the hill off Park Street to the "basin" where canal boats were brought in for repair work.
BIRCH AVENUE Birch Avenue was named for rows of birch trees, which were planted by the late William H. Gildersleeve when the street was laid out on his property in 1919.   Rows of trees were planted on both sides of the street.  None of the trees survived.
BOWMAN AVENUE The first three houses on this street were built by the late Dr. Sands J. Bowman, from whom the street derives its name.  Dr. Bowman was a well-known dentist in Glens Falls for many years and owned considerable property in the city.
BROAD STREET Broad Street was formerly known as West Street, but the name was changed some years ago because its residents objected to notoriety at that time associated with sections of the "west end" of town.  The name Broad Street was chosen because it is a broad street.
BUSH STREET Bush Street was named for the late Henry Bush.  Mr. Bush lived on Glen Street, but he owned property in the vicinity of Bush Street and Haviland Avenue.
CENTER STREET

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This street was originally a lane that ran from Warren Street through the General Morgan farm.  The path was called the "Center Lane."
CHARLOTTE STREET This street was named in honor of Charlotte Conkling Sherman, second wife of Augustus Sherman, for whom Sherman Avenue was named.
CHESTER STREET The late Joseph Fowler, who owned the property in the vicinity of this street, was a native of Chestertown.  When the street opened, he named it in honor of his former home.
CHURCH STREET When Church Street was named, the title was even more appropriate than now, in addition to St. Mary's Church, opposite it on Warren Street and the Baptist Church, facing it on Maple, the Methodist Church stood at its Warren Street entrance, and nearby, the Presbyterian Church.
COLUMBIA AVENUE The street was originally Coffin Street, named for the late Martin Coffin and Sanford Coffin, prominent property owners.  During the period of the World War, the present name was adopted for its patriotic significance.
COOLIDGE AVENUE This street was named by the late Arthur W. Sherman for his wife, Gertrude Coolidge, after he opened the street in the territory of that vicinity which was, before 1895, the city fair ground.  Mr. Sherman and R. A. Little bought the fair grounds and laid out streets there.
COOPER STREET This street, whose present name was probably chosen for the association between James Fennimore Cooper, novelist, and the history of this section, was originally Paddock's Lane, and led to the Paddock farm, past the Warren Pepper brickyards.  The Paddock family lived on the site of the Wilmarth Funeral home.  The name of the street was changed about seventy-five years ago.
CRANDALL STREET Until about twenty years ago, Crandall Street was known as Uncas Street, (Uncas - an Indian name associated with local history).   The change to Crandall Street was made to honor the late Henry L. Crandall, Glens Falls philanthropist.
DAVIS STREET

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Davis Street was named for the late Judge Isaac Davis.  Judge Davis owned much of the property in that section.  His home stood on Glen Street on the site of the present High School building.
DIX AVENUE Dix Avenue was named for one of the city's notable citizens, the late John A. Dix, a native of Glens Falls and a former governor of New York State.  Mr. Dix lived at the corner of Ridge Street and Dix Ave.
ELIZABETH STREET

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Elizabeth Street was named for Miss Elizabeth Powers, daughter of the late Mr. and Mrs. John S. Powers.  Mr. Powers dealt extensively in real estate, laying out Elizabeth Street and building numerous houses in its vicinity, as well as on Orville Street, Darwin Avenue, Sherman Avenue and Crandall Street.
ELKO STREET Like Sierra and Tahoe Streets, the name of this street has no local significance, but was chosen by W. Stanislaus Kelleher, local real estate operator and a former resident of Nevada, in honor of his former home.  Elko is a village in Nevada
Note: This street was planned but never developed.
EXCHANGE STREET This street was formerly known as "the Lane" running from Glen Street to "the Back Street, " now Elm Street from 1836 to 1838.   E. Williams operated a store on the site of Erlanger’s Men's Store, known as "The Exchange," and from this enterprise, the present name of the street was derived.  This corner was also the site of the first brick store to be erected in the village in 1814.
FIELDING STREET

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About sixty-five years ago, Isaac Fielding moved his house from Broad Street to the street which now bears his name.  The house, a brick building, is still standing in Fielding Street and is the home of his daughter, Miss Etta Fielding.  The Fielding home was the first on the street.
FORT AMHERST ROAD Fort Amherst Road commemorates one of the series of fortifications which stretched between Fort Edward and the redoubts at the head of Lake George during the Indian wars.  The site of the fort is believed to be near the road.
FREDELLA AVENUE Fredella Ave. was formerly Lime Street, named for one of the city's major industries.  The name was later changed to honor Joseph Fredella, a contractor who developed the street.
GEER STREET

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This street was opened about twenty-five years ago by the late Walter Rogers and named for the Geer family, of which he was a descendant.  The family was prominent in the early history of the village, and formerly owned a farm in that section of the city.    William Beebe, of New York, famous naturalist and undersea explorer, is a descendant of the Geer family.
GLENWOOD AVENUE Glenwood Avenue was originally Brick Yard Road.  The present name was adopted about thirty years ago when Charles D. Moore and the late Charles A. Hovey began to develop the section.   Because of its opening on Glen Street, and since it commanded a view of the forests, the new residents chose the name "Glenwood" as most appropriate.
GOODMAN STREET Named for the late Samuel Goodman, this street that runs between Grant Avenue and Sheridan Street was once part of a farm pasture land and truck garden which was owned and operated by Mr. Goodman for many years.
GOODWIN AVENUE This street was named for the late James B. Goodwin. Mr. Goodwin owned the majority of the houses on the street, which was for many years private.   Mr. Goodwin was a great uncle of Mrs. Lawrence E. Ross, Fort Amherst Road.
GRAND STREET Like Fulton and Washington Streets, the name of this street has no local significance, but was taken from a street of the same name in New York City by the late Martin J. Coffin.   Pearl St. was similarly named.   This group of streets was laid out about 1850.
GRANT AVENUE This is one of a group of streets in this section which were named for the country's chief executives, and was so called in honor of Ulysses S. Grant, Civil war general and president.
GRAVES STREET Graves Street, which runs from Ridge Street to Lexington Avenue, was opened in 1923.   It was named for the late Amos Graves.   The street was laid out near the site of the old Graves' homestead.
GROVE AVENUE Grove Avenue was named for a grove of pine trees that formerly extended from it to Marion Avenue, Glen and Charlotte Streets, covering an area of two blocks.  The grove was cut down about 1890.
HARTFORD AVENUE

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About twenty years ago, John Q. Reynolds, of Ridge Road, deeded to the city a small tract of land, and since he was a former resident of Hartford, N.Y., Mr. Reynolds asked that the street constructed in this section be named Hartford Avenue.
HARRISON AVENUE Harrison Avenue was originally called Lydia Street, named by the late Isaac Crandall in honor of his sister-in-law when he deeded the street to the city about sixty-five years ago.  During the presidency of Benjamin Harrison, the name was changed to Harrison to correspond with other streets in that section that were named for presidents.
HASKELL AVENUE Haskell Avenue was named for the firm of Weil, Haskell and Co., which shortly after 1890 bought twenty acres of land in that vicinity and erected a factory.  Several houses for employees were also built on the land purchased.
HAVILAND AVENUE As with many streets which were named for men who helped develop the city during its early history, Haviland Avenue was so called in honor of the late Roger Haviland.   Mr. Haviland lived at the corner of Knight and South Streets, and owned much property in that section.
HORICON PLACE Horicon Place which provides one of the main entries into the Broad Acres development, was so named because it is a natural projection of Horicon Avenue across the extension of Lincoln Avenue.
HORICON AVENUE The name Horicon is of Indian origin and recalls the Indian history and legend in which this section abounds.  There seems to be no particular reason why "Horicon" is more applicable to this street than any other; it was merely a word of local significance.
HOYT AVENUE At the same time that the late George W. Vanderheyden opened Vanderheyden Street, he laid out another street in his property and named it Hoyt Avenue in honor of his wife, whose maiden name was Mary Jane Hoyt.  Hoyt Avenue was opened about sixty-five years ago.
IDA STREET

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One of several streets in the city which bear feminine names, Ida Street was so named by the late L. P. Juvet in honor of one of his nieces.  Mr. Juvet owned several lots in that section of the city.
JOHN STREET

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John Street was named for the late John L. Kenworthy, grandfather of Councilman Walter G. Kenworthy.  Mr. Kenworthy owned a farm in that section, and his name was given to the street when it was laid out about forty years ago.
JUVET STREET Juvet Street was named for the late L.P. Juvet, who owned property in that section.  Mr. Juvet, a native of Switzerland, was the inventor of the Time Globe, which indicates not only the local time, but the time in every part of the world.
KEENAN STREET

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This was named for the late John Keenan, who lived on Warren Street opposite its intersection.  Mr. Keenan was president of the village of Glens Falls in 1871, 1875 and 1876.  He ran for office again, but was defeated, according to record, because of his energetic campaign for brick sidewalks.  Previous to that time, boardwalks had served.
KENWORTHY AVENUE Kenworthy Avenue was named for the late John L. Kenworthy, grandfather of Councilman Walter G. Kenworthy.  The councilman’s father, George Kenworthy, laid out the street.
LAKE AVENUE

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One of a group of streets that derive their names from characteristics of Crandall Park, Lake Avenue was named for Crandall lake, or pond, which lies in the park opposite its Glen Street intersection.
LAPHAM PLACE This street was formerly Park Avenue, so named because it was laid out next to the city park.  The present name was adopted about eighteen years ago in honor of the late Byron Lapham, who built the Lapham Apartments on this street.
LEXINGTON AVENUE Lexington Avenue was originally Roberts Avenue, named for a family which formerly lived there.  In 1933, the majority of the residents of the street signed a petition asking that it be known as Lexington Avenue, a name suggested by Howard G. Potter, real estate operator who helped to develop that section.
LINCOLN AVENUE To correspond with Washington, Jefferson and Madison Streets, and Grant and Harrison Avenues which were named for presidents, Lincoln Avenue was named for Abraham Lincoln.  The street was originally known as Dixon Road, leading from the plank road past the old fair grounds to the Dixon farm, now owned by Jabez N. Ingalsbe.  The name was changed about thirty-five years ago.
LITTLE STREET Although the Little family has been prominent in the city's history for generations, Little Street has no connection with the family.  The name Little was chosen as being merely descriptive, referring to the shortness of the street.
MADISON STREET

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This street is another in a group named in honor of the country first chief executives.  To correspond with Washington and Jefferson Streets, and Grant, Harrison and Lincoln Avenues, the street was named for James Madison, the fourth chief executive.
MAPLE STREET Probably every city has named one or more of its streets for trees, and Glens Falls, noted for its beautiful trees, has as reasonable a claim to this practice as any.   Maple Street is one of several in the city so named.  The maples that line it make it particularly suitable.
MARION AVENUE Marion Avenue was opened by the late D. W. Sherman, who named it after his wife, Marion.  The Marion House at Lake George is also named after her.
MASON STREET In the 1870's, the late John P. Mason bought a tract of land on Upper Bay Street and opened up Mason Street, which he gave to the city.  He developed the street as far as Stoddard Avenue.  Mr. Mason's daughter, Miss Helen Mason, now resides at 14 Gage Avenue.
MAY STREET This street was named by the late Martin Coffin in honor of his wife.  In his early married life, Mr. Coffin laid out the street and built his home at the corner of Ridge and May Streets, opposite the site of the Ridge Street School.  May Street was opened about 1850.
Mc DONALD STREET Half of this street was given by the late Walter and Leonard McDonald, for whom it was named, and who owned much of the property in that section.  The late Sanford Coffin, father of Dr. Henry Coffin, gave the other half.  The street was laid out about 1870.  The McDonald homestead stood on the site of the Glens Falls Home.
MISSION STREET Mission Street derives its name from the West Street Mission, which stood opposite its entrance on West Street, now Broad Street.  The street was so named nearly fifty years ago on the suggestion of a Swedish gardener and was approved by the city.   Until that time, this street, which had been in existence for some time, was without designation.
MONUMENT AVENUE Monument Avenue, one of the newer streets of the city, was named for the monument that stands in Crandall Park opposite its Glen Street intersection.  At the base of the monument are interred the bodies of the late Henry Crandall, Glens Falls philanthropist, and his wife.
MURDOCK AVENUE Murdock Avenue was named for a real estate promoter of that name who developed the property in that section of the city, dividing it into lots and laying out streets.
NEW PRUYN STREET

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This street was named for the late Samuel Pruyn, who purchased what was formerly known as the West Street burying ground and developed that section in the late '80's and early '90's.  "Pruyn Street" as he originally intended to name the street conflicted with Pine Street, so he named it New Pruyn instead.  Mr. Pruyn's home stood on the site of the Clark Textile Mills.  Mr. Pruyn built nearly all the houses on New Pruyn Street.
OAK STREET

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The oak trees which years ago distinguished this street have long since vanished, but the name Oak Street, chosen when it was appropriate has remained unchanged.
OGDEN STREET This street was named for the late Levi Ogden, who lived on Bacon Street, but who owned property in that section.  Mr. Ogden was a prominent real estate operator and owned and operated a fleet of canal boats as a transportation line.
PARK STREET

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Park Street memorializes an old and eminent Glens Falls family whose property and homestead lay in that neighborhood.  Solomon Parks donated the Glens Falls Hospital building.
PEARL STREET In the early history of Glens Falls, a persistent attempt was made to name the city "Pearl Village" or "Pearlville."  Since these attempts never succeeded, and since Pearl Street is located in the older section of the city, it seems reasonable to suppose that the name "Pearl" may be a remnant of this early agitation.
PERSHING ROAD This street is among the recent developments in the Broad Acres section and is named in honor of General John J. Pershing, commander of the American overseas armies in the World War.
PHILO AVENUE Philo Avenue was named after Hiram Philo, an old Glens Falls surveyor, who owned hundreds of feet frontage on Glen Street in that section.  He built the first house on the street and also remodeled the small corner house facing Glen Street, built about 100 years ago.  Mr. Philo's name appears on many old Glens Falls deeds.
PINE STREET Of the many streets in the city which have been named for trees, the history of Pine Street is perhaps the most unusual.  At one time, a pine tree grew in the center of the street, and it was from this tree that the street was named.
PLATT STREET This street was named by the late Martin Coffin, an uncle of Dr. Henry Coffin, Warren Street, who laid it out through property that he purchased from Elmore Platt.  The property comprised the Platt farm.
POTTER STREET Potter Street was named in honor of the late Warren Potter by his grandson, Howard G. Potter, local real estate operator, when he opened the street in 1923.
QUADE AVENUE

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Quade Avenue was named for the late Timothy J. Quade, who owned much property in that section.  His son, John E. Quade, who for many years operated a store at the corner of Sherman Avenue and Cortland Street, now lives at 10 Quade Avenue.
RAINVILLE AVENUE

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This street which runs from the Boulevard to Dix Avenue, was named for the late Alec Rainville, who built the house that stands on the corner of Rainville Avenue and the Boulevard, and which is now owned by Arthur 0. Lee, about thirty-five years ago.  The home of Mr. Rainville's son, Dominic Rainville, stands opposite the Lee home.
RIDGE STREET Formerly known as Quaker Street because it led to the Quaker cemetery on the ridge, this street was later called Ridge after the Sanford Ridge community to which it ran, which in the early days was a thriving business settlement.
ROGERS STREET This street was laid out by the late Walter Rogers and named by him for his family. Mr. Rogers also named Geer Street.
ROGERS TERRACE  This street was formerly known as the Shermantown Road, since it led to the settlement known as Shermantown, where the Sherman mills were located.  The present name was taken from the Rogers family, for whom Rogers Street, located a block away and running northerly, was named by the late Walter Rogers who opened the street.
SANFORD STREET

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Sanford Street was named for David Sanford, who settled in 1795 on the ridge above Glens Falls which bears his name.  The house that he built about three miles above Glens Falls facing the Sanford’s Ridge Road is still standing and is now the home of John Ferguson.
SARGENT STREET This street, one of several which were laid out recently by D.J. Fitzgerald, Jr., postmaster, was named by him for Edward H. Sargent of Albany, chief engineer in charge of constructing the Sacandaga Reservoir.
SCHOOL STREET School Street was so named because its South Street intersection faces the site of the former Union School, which was located in Union Square, formed by the intersection of Broad Street, School Street and South Street.
SHERMAN AVENUE Sherman Avenue was originally known as Hawk-Eye Street in honor of the Fennimore Cooper character.  About 1850, the name was changed to Sherman Avenue in recognition of Augustus Sherman, who owned much land in that section and who built the house now standing at the north corner of Sherman Avenue and Glen Street.
SHIPPEY STREET Shippey Street was originally Jennie Street, named for the wife of the late Darwin Sherman, a prominent real estate holder.  About 1906 the present name was adopted in honor of Frank Shippey, a general contractor and trustee of Glens Falls village.
SIERRA STREET The name Sierra was chosen for this street by W. Stanislaus Kelleher, who lived for some years in the Sierra Mountains of California and Nevada.  When Mr. Kelleher purchased the development in that section of the city, he named one of the streets that he laid out in honor of his former home.
STAPLE STREET Another of the city's streets deriving its name from a property owner is Staple Street, which was named for the late Abram Staple.  Mr. Staple formerly lived at 7 Haviland Avenue, and owned much real estate in that part of the city.
STEVENS STREET   This street was laid out and named by F. E. Stevens, who lives on the County Line Road between Hudson Falls and Sanford Ridge, and who is well known here since he has delivered milk in this city for more than sixty years.  Mr. Stevens bought property around the site of the street and developed it during the late '90's, building most of the houses.
STEWART AVENUE This street was named for the late Alexander Stewart, a Civil War veteran who lived at the corner of South and Fifth Streets.  Mr. Stewart was the father of Mrs. Jennie Davison of So. Glens Falls.
STODDARD AVENUE When the late John Mason opened up Mason Street, he also gave to the city Sarella Street as far as Stoddard Avenue, and built for the late Frank Stoddard the first house on the corner of Sarella Street and Stoddard Avenue, which was named for this resident.   The original name for Sarella Street was Franklin Street, also named after Mr. Stoddard.   Mr. Stoddard was probably best known for the stereopticon slides which he prepared in connection with his photography when this diversion was popular.

TAHOE STREET 

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This street, one of several laid out recently by W. Stanislaus Kelleher, was named by him for Lake Tahoe, Nevada Mr. Kelleher formerly lived in California and Nevada.
Note: This street was planned but never developed.
TERRA COTTA AVENUE Terra Cotta Avenue is named for what was formerly one of the city's important industries.  The terra cotta works were located in the vicinity of the street.
THOMSON AVENUE  This street was named for the late Lemon Thomson, a prominent real estate Operator, who developed a great deal of property in the city.
VANDERHEYDEN STREET

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Vanderheyden Street was so named by the late George W. Vanderheyden when he opened the street about sixty-five years ago.  Mr. Vanderheyden, who was the grandfather of Mrs. Edward M. Angell, lived on Glen St., but he owned property in that section.
WALNUT STREET

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Like many street names, the term Walnut Street lost its original significance long ago.  But at one time when the village was more sparsely settled, it was quite appropriate, since groves of walnut trees were a distinguishing feature of the section.
WARREN STREET Warren Street was named for Gen. Joseph Warren, of Revolutionary War fame.  The street follows the old military road from Fort Edward to Lake George.
WASHBURN AVENUE This street was named for the late Noah Washburn, who lived on the corner of Bay Street and Washburn Avenue.  He owned the land there and laid out the street.
WASHINGTON STREET This street is one of a group which were named about 1850 by the late Martin Coffin for streets that he particularly admired in New York City.  Mr. Coffin and his two brothers, John and Sanford, owned much of the property in this section of the city.  Sanford Coffin built his home at the corner of Washington and Ridge; the John Coffin home stood on the site of the Ridge Street School, and Martin Coffin's home stood at the opposite corner of May and Ridge.
 

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